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Posts Tagged ‘GHG Emissions’

EPA Endangerment Finding Will Impact Ski Areas

April 17th, 2009 by skigreenguy | Comments Off | Filed in Policy & Social Change, Ski Industry
snowcat-2

For the "welfare of current and future generations," stop the brutal grooming

The US Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) release of an endangerment finding today states that “greenhouse gases in the atmosphere endanger the public health and welfare of current and future generations.” This EPA action was the result of a Supreme Court decision two years ago that ordered the agency to investigate the effects of carbon emissions under the Clean Air Act. However, this EPA finding will not result in major regulation in the immediate future. Congress will likely enact their own green house gas (GHG) regulations that better reflects industry desires and politics of the day. Nevertheless, the EPA move does provide strong impetus to the ski industry—as well as other industries responsible for GHG emissions—to implement meaningful GHG emissions measures and controls.

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First Ski Resort to Report Verified GHG Emissions: Grand Targhee Resort

April 13th, 2009 by skigreenguy | 3 Comments | Filed in Policy & Social Change, Ski Industry Technology, Ski Resorts, United States
Grand Targhee: Verifiably Good

Grand Targhee: Verifiably Good

In an effort to accurately and comprehensively manage its emissions, Grand Targhee Resort elected to voluntarily report its emissions inventory with The Climate Registry, a voluntary greenhouse gas (GHG) reporting program.  According to a March 26 press release, Grand Targhee is very concerned about climate change and is “interested in opportunities to engage hundreds of thousands of winter sports enthusiasts each year through education and example.” Known for a reliable snow pack (500 inch annual snowfall), Grand Targhee certainly has a lot to protect.

The Climate Registry is a nonprofit collaboration among North American states, provinces, territories and Native Sovereign Nations that sets consistent and transparent standards to calculate, verify and publicly report greenhouse gas emissions into a single registry. Christina Thomure, Director of Sustainable Operations at Grand Targhee Resort reported that The Climate Registry’s protocol for measuring greenhouse gases “ensures a level of accuracy and transparency that far exceeds all other tools we evaluated.” Notably, the Registry requires annual third party verification and is widely viewed as the premier GHG registry in North America.

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Ski Resort Tries Large-Scale Renewable Energy

March 29th, 2009 by skigreenguy | Comments Off | Filed in Policy & Social Change, Ski Industry, Ski Resorts, United States
Jimmy Peak's "Zephyr" fulfills half of Jimmy Peak's electrical demand

Wind energy fulfills half of Jimmy Peak's electrical demand

The Associated Press reports a model of large-scale renewable energy production at Massachusetts’ Jimmy Peak Ski Resort. The installation of Jimmy’s 386-foot, $3.9 million turbine named “Zephyr” cut the resorts electricity costs by $200,000 last year — the first full year the turbine was operational. In contrast to simply buying renewable energy credits to offset greenhouse gas emissions, the turbine represents a green technology that can provide needed electrical power—and an immediate payoff. (more…)

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Climate Change Study: What Does the Future Hold for the Northwest?

February 20th, 2009 by skigreenguy | 1 Comment | Filed in How to Ski Green, Policy & Social Change, United States
Will Mount Baker always have the deepest snow on earth?

Will Mount Baker always have the deepest snow on earth?

What does climate change mean for the Northwestern portion of the United States? An in-depth report from the Climate Impacts Group at the University of Washington provides some grim answers to that question. Among the “highest confidence” predictions for this region include: warmer temperature throughout the year, decreased summer water supply, and increased probability of drought. Skier translation: more rain and less snow in the winter. But perhaps the most surprising finding is the speed of change. The authors point out significant impacts in just the next ten years: (more…)

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